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20130201
20130209
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
this morning on the shooting death of a former navy s.e.a.l. known as the deadliest sniper in u.s. history. 38-year-old chris kyle was killed yesterday along with a second man at a gun range near ft. worth, texas. these are pictures of kyle taken from the security company he founded after leaving the navy. the gunman accused of killing kyle has been identified as eddie ray routh. he is in custody facing two counts of capital murder. earlier i spoke with one of kyle's friends, jason kos, about the man he called a war hero. >> he and a friend took a marine that was suffering from ptsd to a gun range to shoot and as a way that he always did giving back and, you know, it was certainly him taking his time to help, again, help war heroes. >> he had quite a reputation in the field as one of the most lethal snipers out there. how did he handle that? >> you know, he viewed, chris viewed it as his job and he was protecting his brothers, frankly. he as a man was quite contrary to that because he was incredibly loving father and charismatic and really caring person. so, it's quite a contrast from what he
certainly didn't know him as a navy s.e.a.l. he was a man of incredible character. he led by example, always. little things he did. you know, throughout life, the things that i saw were incredible. he always stopped to take time to talk to whoever was around him and just incredibly humble. very funny, as well. i know you guys played a clip on conan where he kind of starred that show. but he was just a very humble, loving, fun, wonderful man. >> he is married with children, as well, correct? >> yes, ma'am. >> have you had any contact with his family? >> just sent them a message. yes, sent a few messages of support. but it's certainly incredibly sad time. >> how did he do when he came back from war? certainly so many soldiers struggle. how did he handle it? >> you know, when he came back, i think, obviously, the transition from serving our country was four tours of, you know, heavy combat. it was difficult for him to not want to be over there. obviously, all that stuff is in his book. but what i'm most impressed by, he became one of the biggest advocates for his brothers and sisters in the mil
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)